Travel with ASA Cultural Tours: over 40 years of innovation and excellence

In partnership with ASA Cultural Tours Join an ASA cultural tour for a fresh vision of the world. Learn about places you have always longed to visit or see your favourites with new eyes. Feed your imagination with new sights and knowledge, and delight in the company of like-minded travellers. All ASA tours reflect a … Read on

The flapper

This is a sneak peek into edition 27 of Traces! By Jessica Barratt The flapper emerged in the 1920s in many countries around the world, including Australia. These modern women embraced a new lifestyle that was viewed by many at the time as outrageous, pushing the barriers of economic, social and political freedom. The word ‘flapper’ originated … Read on

Murder or misadventure on the Moana?

This is a sneak peek into edition 27 of Traces! By Mel Tasker ‘My God, I’ve poisoned two people with oxalic acid in mistake for lime juice!’ With that single alleged – and later disavowed and recanted – statement, so began the fateful afternoon of Friday 3 January 1919 on board the Royal Mail Steamer (RMS) Moana. … Read on

How the car changed Australia

This is a sneak peek into edition 27 of Traces! By Ann Wilcox, Old Treasury Building We live in a material world. The things we own, the clothes we wear, and the houses we live in all express who we are, or who we want to be. But if there was any single object that defined … Read on

Forgotten heroes of the Australian Voluntary Hospital

This is a sneak peek into edition 26 of Traces! By John Ramsland At the outbreak of war in 1914, there were many young Australian doctors and nurses in the United Kingdom receiving specialised training in a variety of hospitals. More than 100 of these medical professionals volunteered with the Australian Voluntary Hospital in France. At … Read on

The dashed hopes of the Aldershot smelter

This is a sneak peek into edition 26 of Traces! By David Huggonson The Queensland Smelting Company, near Maryborough, began with high hopes, plenty of investment and sound management. The venture was, however, short lived. In July 1888 in London, the Queensland Smelting Company was formed to treat the refractory ore that was resistant to standard gold … Read on

Louisa Seddon, New Zealand’s secret ‘queen’

This is a sneak peek into edition 26 of Traces! By Rick Giles More than just support for her husband, former premier Richard Seddon, Australian-born Louisa Seddon was an influential giant of New Zealand politics. Richard and Louisa Seddon married on 13 January 1869, and were one of New Zealand’s great power couples. Richard, who became New … Read on

Old Colonist mosaics inscripted

This is a sneak peek into edition 25 of Traces! By Beth M. Robertson, Manager of Preservation, the State Library of South Australia A unique collection of photographic mosaics depicting South Australian colonists has been inscripted into the UNESCO Australian Memory of the World Register. On 16 December 1871, businessman (and former convict) Emanuel Solomon placed an … Read on

Memories of a Melbourne childhood

This is a sneak peek into edition 25 of Traces! By Lorraine Evans On special occasions, my extended family would gather together at Gran and Pop’s to celebrate. There was always plenty of laughter and fun, and Aunty Sally was always the loudest in the room. Before she passed away at the age of 83, Sally wrote … Read on

Affairs of honour

This is a sneak peek into edition 25 of Traces! By Mel Tasker On the chilly winter morning of Friday 17 August 1832, a merchant and a newspaper man stood facing each other on the grounds of Richmond House, Fremantle, in Western Australia. Each carried the heavy burden of societal expectation – and a duelling pistol. … Read on

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