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It seems as though Facebook has taken quite a broad approach to the term ‘news’. Unfortunately, our Traces Facebook page has been caught up in the current media ban. In the meantime, join our mailing list below to keep up to date with Traces!

Healthy curiosity: deciphering pharmacy registers

Diving into Traces edition 13, contributor Peter Hobbins explores the deciphering of pharmacy registers. There are stories in these old registers. Stories about suffering and healing. Stories about families and communities. Stories about changing neighbourhoods and our rising expectations for long and robust lives. Yet, the books themselves sit forlornly on shelves in local museums. … Read on

The true facts of Colonel John George Nathaniel Gibbes

Diving into Traces edition 13, contributor Terry Jenkins explores the life of Colonel John George Nathaniel Gibbes. Sometimes it is pure chance that unravels a genealogical mystery. And such is the case with the parentage of Colonel John George Nathaniel Gibbes (1787–1873), the colonial administrator in New South Wales. I have to admit that this … Read on

Sneak peek: Red Lead: The naval cat with nine lives

Diving into Traces edition 13, here is a sneak peek into Red Lead: The naval cat with nine lives, written by Roland Perry. The new recruit Hector Waller, the newly appointed captain of the cruiser HMAS Perth, could hardly believe his eyes. It was October 1941 and he was about to dine in a restaurant … Read on

Sneak peek: Beyond the Stage – Creative Australian stories from the Great War

Thanks to our friends at Wakefield Press, here is a sneak peek into Beyond the Stage – Creative Australian stories from the Great War – Edited by Anna Goldsworthy and Mark Carroll. A not so trivial pursuit Telsie Hague’s war Mark Carroll Born in Angaston, South Australia, circa 1886, Myrtle Ellman (Telsie) Hague was the daughter of … Read on

Trenches, trees and tributes: air-war heritage in a suburban park

Diving into Traces edition 12, contributor Dr Peter Hobbins uncovers the air-war heritage located in a Sydney suburban park. To the children playing nearby, a small relic in their local park probably seems quaint, if they notice it at all. Yet it links Allison Playground in Sydney’s Dulwich Hill with communities across Australia, England, Germany … Read on

Finding your convict ancestor

Between the years of 1788 and 1868, more than 160,000 convicts were transported from Britain to Australia aboard 825 ships. With so many people sent to Australian shores over the course of 80 years, it can be a daunting task trying to locate your ancestor among the masses. In edition 13 of Traces, we provide … Read on

A day in the life of a Vernon boy

Diving into Traces Edition 12, contributor Sarah Luke explores the life of schoolboys of the Nautical School Ship Vernon. In April 1880, 140 years ago, schooling became compulsory in New South Wales for six- to 14-year-olds. Out on Sydney Harbour, beside Cockatoo Island, the Nautical School Ship Vernon was not impacted by this change in … Read on

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